In Their Eyes were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston Uses Dialect When Tea Cake Speaks in Order to

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In Their Eyes were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston Uses Dialect When Tea Cake Speaks in Order to Show That He Is from a Different Background Than Janie. By using dialect, Hurston is able to create a contrast between the two characters and their backgrounds. This allows readers to see the difference in the way that each character views the world.

Their Eyes Were Watching God: Crash Course Literature 301

In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston uses dialect when Tea Cake speaks in order to show the reader how he thinks and feels. By doing this, she allows us to understand him better as a character. It also gives us a glimpse into the culture of the time period.

Which Sentence from Their Eyes were Watching God Contains an Example of Dialect?

There are a number of examples of dialect in Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes were Watching God. One example can be found in the following sentence: “She couldn’t read but she could sew and how.” In this sentence, the character is speaking in a very nonstandard form of English.

This is just one example of the many instances of dialect that can be found throughout the novel.

Which Phrase from the Excerpt is the Best Example of Nonstandard English?

“Which Phrase from the Excerpt is the Best Example of Nonstandard English?” The phrase “from the excerpt” is an example of nonstandard English. This phrase is not commonly used in standard English, and it would be considered incorrect in most formal contexts.

However, it is not necessarily wrong, and it can be used in some informal situations.

Mr. Turner’S Words Reveal His

When Mr. Turner speaks, his words reveal his true character. He is a man who is not afraid to speak his mind, and he is very honest with his opinions. He is also a man who is very intelligent and well-spoken.

His words reveal that he is a deep thinker, and he has a lot of knowledge about the world around him.

Which Aspect of Early Twentieth-Century Society in the South is Illustrated in This Excerpt?

In the early twentieth century, the South was a region of great economic and social change. This excerpt from W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk illustrates one aspect of this change: the increased opportunities for education that were available to African Americans. Before the Civil War, few African Americans had access to formal education.

In the years after the war, however, Southern states began to establish public schools for black children. By the early 1900s, many African Americans were attending these schools and receiving a quality education. This excerpt from Du Bois’s book shows how education can empower individuals and help them achieve their goals.

For many African Americans in the early twentieth century, getting an education was a way to improve their station in life and escape poverty. It was also a way to gain equality with whites in a society that still treated them as second-class citizens.

What Do Tea Cake’S Words Reveal About His Intentions?

When Tea Cake speaks in Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, his words reveal a great deal about his intentions. He is a man who is very aware of the power of words and he uses them to his advantage. He is also a man who is not afraid to speak his mind and he is very honest with the people around him.

Tea Cake is a man who knows what he wants and he is not afraid to go after it.

In Their Eyes were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston Uses Dialect When Tea Cake Speaks in Order to

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What Dialect is Used in Their Eyes Were Watching God?

The dialect used in Their Eyes Were Watching God is African American Vernacular English (AAVE). AAVE is a nonstandard dialect of English spoken by some African Americans. It is also sometimes called Ebonics or Black English.

The term “AAVE” was coined in the 1970s by linguist William Labov, who recognized that it is a distinct dialect with its own grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. AAVE has been influenced by the languages spoken by enslaved Africans who were brought to the Americas. It also has been influenced by other nonstandard English dialects, such as Southern American English and Caribbean Creole English.

AAVE shares some features with these other dialects, but it is not simply a mix of them. It has its own unique history and development. One feature of AAVE is the use of what are called “zero copula” verbs.

This means that in many cases, the verb “to be” is left out entirely. For example, someone might say “She my sister” instead of “She is my sister.” This usage can be seen in Their Eyes Were Watching God when Janie says things like “He look lak he studyin’ ’bout something” (p. 9) and “‘Bout time you wake up,” Joe said crossly” (p. 16).

Another feature of AAVE is the use of double negatives. A double negative occurs when two negative words are used together for emphasis, as in the sentence “I ain’t got no money.” In standard English, this would just be written as “I don’t have any money.”

But in AAVE, double negatives are quite common and are often used for emphasis or to express surprise or disbelief. For example, Janie’s friend Pheoby says things like “‘Lawd! You mean tuh tell me dat after all dem years you done had yo’ eye on him?” (p.. 36) and “‘Scuse me,’ she said quickly… ‘but dat ain’t no way tuh talk ’bout yo’ husban'” (p.. 37). So those are some of the main features of AAVE that can be seen in Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Why Does Hurston Use Dialect in Their Eyes Were Watching God?

In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston uses dialect to capture the vernacular of her characters. She believed that “dialect is the speech of a people who have no written language and who have been shaped by their environment.” By writing in dialect, she was able to create a more authentic representation of the African American experience.

Dialect can be difficult for readers to understand, but it can also provide insight into the way people speak and think. It can be used to create a sense of place or time, or to reveal information about a character’s background or social class. In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hurston uses dialect to paint a picture of life in the American South during the early 20th century.

The use of dialect gives the novel a unique flavor and allows readers to hear the voices of her characters.

Which Excerpt from Their Eyes Were Watching God is the Best Example of Regional Dialect?

There are a number of different dialects used in Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. The following excerpt is just one example of the regional dialect used throughout the book: “She got up and walked to de gate. Dey was two or three white mens settin’ on de gallery talkin’ ’bout politics lak dey knowed what dey was talkin’ ’bout. She reckon it warn’t nothin’ but politics.”

This excerpt is written in African American Vernacular English, which is a type of regional dialect. This particular dialect is spoken by black people who live in the southern United States. It includes features such as dropped consonants, shortened words, and unique grammatical structures.

What Do You Think Hurston Wishes to Convey by Having Her Characters Use Dialect?

When reading a novel, it is not uncommon for readers to come across words or phrases that they do not understand. This can be frustrating, but it can also add to the richness of the text. In “Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston, dialect plays an important role in conveying the characters’ thoughts and feelings.

Dialect is defined as a variety of a language that is characteristic of a particular group of people. It can include different pronunciations, grammar, and vocabulary. In “Their Eyes Were Watching God”, Hurston uses dialect to show how her characters speak differently from each other.

This helps to create a sense of authenticity and allows readers to better understand the characters’ backgrounds and personalities. One reason why Hurston may have chosen to use dialect in her novel is to convey the idea that everyone has their own way of speaking. Just as we all have our own unique experiences and perspectives, so too do we all have our own way of communicating.

By using dialect, Hurston shows that no two people are exactly alike – even if they share the same language. Another reason why Hurston may have used dialect in “Their Eyes Were Watching God” is to highlight the importance of communication within relationships. The way we speak says a lot about who we are and how we relate to others.

The characters in Hurston’s novel often communicate with each other in different ways, depending on their relationship status or level of intimacy. For example, when Janie’s husband Logan tells her she should smile more, she responds with angry sarcasm (Hurston 19). This exchange would likely sound very different if Janie was talking to her best friend or someone she was attracted to.

Dialect thus reveals how our communication changes based on our relationships with others – something that everyone can relate to.

Conclusion

In “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” Zora Neale Hurston uses dialect when Tea Cake speaks in order to show the difference between how educated blacks and uneducated blacks spoke. Tea Cake is uneducated, but he is not ignorant. He is street-smart and knows how to survive in the rough world that he lives in.

His speech patterns reflect this.

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